The Literary Drover No. 1708

Reference to the Golden Eagle has brought additional interest to The Jhon Collector Mysteries. Mention of personal experience has resulted in, conservatively, a deluge of communications from people wanting to know more.

You ask, I do:

One to three months prior to egg laying a Golden Eagle pair will build or re-establish a nest made of sticks and vegetation. The structure may also include bones, antlers, and human-made objects such as write and fence posts. The interior of the nest will be lined with local vegetation such as yucca, grass, bark, leaves moss, and lichens, and may also utilize boughs from conifers. Part of the interior of the nest may use aromatic leaves, presumably to keep insect pests away.

Golden Eagles which return to use the same nest in successive years are known as “Resident birds”. In this case they may add nesting material year-round. The Golden Eagle nest which endures throughout the year can be five to six feet in diameter, and two feet high, enclosing a bowl of three feet by two feet deep. The largest Golden Eagle nest recorded was twenty feet high and eight and a half feet wide.

Starting 1–3 months before egg-laying, a Golden Eagle pair builds a nest of sticks and vegetation—sometimes also including bones, antlers, and human-made objects such as wire and fence posts. They line the nest with locally available vegetation, such as yucca, grasses, bark, leaves, mosses and lichens, or conifer boughs. They often include aromatic leaves, possibly to keep insect pests at bay. Resident birds continue adding nest material year-round, reusing the same nest for multiple seasons and sometimes alternating between two nests. Nests are huge, averaging some 5-6 feet wide, and 2 feet high, enclosing a bowl about 3 feet by 2 feet deep. The largest Golden Eagle nest on record was 20 feet tall, 8.5 feet wide.

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